“Blogging is not writing. It’s graffiti with punctuation.”

I watched the movie Contagion last night.  In the movie, Jude Law plays the role of a journalistic blogger named Alan Krumwiede.  When I first saw this movie, I didn’t even really know what blogging was.  Either it hadn’t grown in popularity yet, or I had just been sheltered from it.  In any case, I had dismissed it without much thought.

Now that I’ve had much more exposure to blogging (and have my own blog), I noticed Krumwiede more in the movie.  It seemed far-fetched, but global influence this character had on people via his blog was incredible.

Since I had seen the movie before, I wasn’t paying close attention throughout the whole thing last night.  But, I caught a statement that another character made to Krumwiede that made me crack up: “Blogging is not writing.  It’s graffiti with punctuation.”  I can’t remember which character said it, but he was being serious and the delivery was good.  He refused to acknowledge blogging as a legitimate form of journalism.

In a sense, I can understand this perspective.  Blogging doesn’t require a formal education.  It doesn’t require any kind of credentials.  Anyone can create a blog and anyone write whatever they want on it.  So, from that perspective, I get it.  Not every blogger could be considered a reputable journalist.

I disagree, however, with the statement that “blogging is not writing.”  Of course it is.  An personal or professional e-mail is writing.  A text message is writing.  Merriam-Webster defines writing as:

  1. the act or process of one who writes: as
    1. the act or art of forming visible letters or characters;
    2. the act or practice of literary or musical composition
  2. something written: as
    1. letters or characters that serve as visible signs of ideas, words, or symbols
    2. a letter, note, or notice used to communicate or record
    3. a written composition
    4. INSCRIPTION
  3. a style or form of composition
  4. the occupation of a writer; especially: the profession of authorship

Given this definition, blogging is absolutely a form of writing, and with the explosive growth in the blogging world in recent years, it seems that it is being recognized as such.

I don’t have a degree in journalism or creative writing, but I consider myself to be a writer.  I use the “written” word to communicate my thoughts and feelings.  I have a solid foundation of English grammar and spelling.  I am not a professional writer, but I do consider myself to be a writer.

What are your thoughts?  Do you think blogging is a valid form of writing?

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